Month: <span>November 2018</span>

Tulsa World editorial: The state’s starting to pay attention to eastern Oklahoma concerns about chicken houses

Tulsa World editorial: The state’s starting to pay attention to eastern Oklahoma concerns about chicken houses · From World’s Editorial Writers · Nov 24, 2018 Updated Nov 24, 2018 With the chicken already out of the barn, the state agriculture department is starting to pay attention to the door. An explosion of new eastern Oklahoma…



Wall Street Journal: Bayer to Cut 12,000 Jobs, Shed Coppertone and Dr. Scholl’s Brands

by Ruth Bender | Nov. 29, 2018 German company plans to cut 10% of its workforce as it seeks to regain investors’ favor BERLIN— Bayer AG on Thursday said it would cut 12,000 jobs and sell its animal-health business, Coppertone sunscreens and Dr. Scholl’s foot-care products in an effort to win back investors’ trust after…



Progressive Farmer: Harrington’s Sort & Cull – USDA Final Rule Ends GIPSA

by Todd Neeley, DTN Staff Reporter | November 29, 2018 OMAHA (DTN) — The USDA on Thursday posted a final rule ending the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, https://www.federalregister.gov/documents…, and transferring the standalone agency’s functions to the Agricultural Marketing Service. The Organization for Competitive Markets was critical of the decision. OCM founding member and…



Buzz Feed News: Democrats Can Win Back Rural America, But First They Need To Understand What Bled It Dry

by Sarah Miller, BuzzFeed Contributor and Austin Frerick, BuzzFeed Contributor | November 28, 2018 At the root of rural America’s angst are small towns whose economies have been taken over by a handful of predatory multinationals. Rural and small-town voters turned out in huge numbers in support of the Trump agenda this month. That turnout…



New York Times: The Monopolization of America

by David Leonhardt | November 25, 2018 In one industry after another, big companies have become more dominant over the past 15 years, new data show. The popular telling of the Boston Tea Party gets something wrong. The colonists were not responding to a tax increase. They were responding to the Tea Act of 1773,…



Star Tribune: Farm bankruptcies are on the rise, and bankers worry that far more are on the way

by Adam Belz, Star Tribune | November 26, 2018 Farm bankruptcies are rising in the Midwest and bankers worry more are on the way. Farm bankruptcies are on the rise in Minnesota and across the Upper Midwest. Eighty-four farms filed for Chapter 12 bankruptcy in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana in the…



New Food Economy: Bison bars were supposed to restore Native communities and grass-based ranches. Then came Epic Provisions.

by Marilyn Noble | November 27th, 2018 Tanka, a Native-owned business, invented the commercial bison bar. But Epic took credit, built an empire on a foundation of misleading claims, promised ranchers investment that never materialized, and left an industry struggling in its wake. To hear the processed food industry tell it, the bison bar—the trendy,…



Grand Island Independent: Stressed farmers seek hotline services in near-record numbers

Howdy, Yesterday’s “opportunity to share” while sending around a news article on Midwest farm bankruptcies is today’s news article. Long time Grand Island Independent journalist Robert Pore read my comments yesterday and gave me a call. Thanks to him for his interest. The length of the current 5 year financial downturn in ag is more…



The Atlantic: Death on a Small Farm

From Richard Oswald Farm organizations have fought OSHA regulation relentlessly. They can go anywhere and look at anything. Take grain bin ladders. What if they say you need a cage around the ladder or that it must be replaced by stairs? Or your vintage Deere must have the pto cover Dad cussed until he threw…



Journal Sentinel: Wisconsin dairy farmers barely hanging on as crisis deepens with no end in sight

by Rick Barrett | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | November 26, 2018 This was the year that longtime dairy farmer Jim Goodman decided to call it quits. The third-generation farmer from Wonewoc, northwest of Madison, milked cows for more than four decades. He loved the animals and the work, and had endured hard times, but the…